Our Strategies

As part of our work ethos, we believe in partnering with and contributing to various other platforms working in the field of human rights and development so that sustainable and collective empowerment goals could be reached. So, in addition to providing assistance in individual cases of violence, desertion, prejudicial social practices, caste based discrimination and land related issues, MJAS has aligned itself with the concerns of the overall women’s movement in Rajasthan since the 1990’s. Our organisation also networks with other organisations at the local, state and national levels to enhance their mobilisation and outreach activities to change social norms and practices. Our principle strategies for success are

Knowledge Creation

Mobilisation

Learning Spaces

Networking

Our Themes

In the wake of the Bisalpur Dam rehabilitation, many cases of sexual violence started emerging. Between 1996 and 2006, MJAS actively intervened in a number of rape cases. It all began with the case of Dhapu Meena and while our involvement in this case did not result in justice for Dhapu, it did result in the activists gaining the confidence and respect of women in rural areas and survivors of the violence began to approach MJAS, which enabled the organisation to take a stand in support of these women, as seen in Meena’s case. Read more about her case..

Jan Sunvaai
In 2007, in collaboration with the Mahila Atyachar Virodhi Manch, MJAS organised a jan sunvaai (public hearing) which spread awareness on various redressal mechanisms for cases of violence against women. Read More

Supporting the Survivors of Violence
We realised that changing the socio-cultural situation would be a major challenge but we remained steadfast in efforts to support women survivors of the violence and have made a conscious effort to develop strategies around stopping such violence against women. Read more about the survivor stories..

MJAS has also worked extensively with the Panchayati Raj Institutions to strengthen its ability to address different forms of violence against women. We have worked tirelessly to empower the Panchayati Raj Institutions to address violence against women and provide timely redressal to survivors of violence. Read more on this..

Through our work with the marginalised communities, we have recognised violence is sometimes used as a tool to ensure women are constrained to the socially defined boundaries of behaviour and space. MJAS works to address violence against women in the context of various customary practices like child / early marriage nata, labelling women as dayans / dakans which not only negatively impacts their physical health, but also harms their mental health and the well-being of their children. In our efforts, we have brought many cases of violence and injustice to light regarding many traditional practices. Gradually, we have started working on children’s issues as well. Read more on the case study of Indira and Lali Dhaker..

Child Marriage

Rajasthan has a large number of girls who are married below the legal age of 18 and bear children at a very young age. This comes with an adverse impact on their health and socio-economic well-being. Traditional customs and norms sanctioning the practice, compounded with low levels of education, poverty and economic dependence on traditional subsistence like agriculture or migration to urban centres for work, perpetuate high rates of child marriage and child pregnancy.Read more about our campaigns and programmes on early and child marriage..

Health and nutrition are intrinsically linked with inequality and discrimination. Women and children are often denied equal access to the already limited village health and nutrition resources. Improved access to these resources can empower and protect marginalised women and children and reduce deep rooted injustices and abuse persisting in the society.

Our Intervention
Mobilising the community and other stakeholders to ensure that women and children have easy access to village healthcare services i.e. Primary Health Centres, Sub-Health Centres, Child Health Centres and Anganwadis. Ensure the delivery of services to pregnant and lactating mothers, children and to the community at large through regular health check-ups for children in schools to monitor their health and facilitate intervention when required. Read more about our Health and Nutrition Programme with CRY..

Over the last two decades in particular, women are no longer confined to the domestic sphere but have ventured into the public sphere especially for work. MJAS has actively intervened in cases of workplace sexual harassment reported at the Ajmer Education Department, District Collector’s Office, Employment Office and the Railway Department. Our intervention in several cases has revealed many workplaces do not have internal committees on anti-sexual harassment or Prevention of Sexual Harassment (POSH). In addition to this, we also work with women to understand their rights in the workplace and the importance of accessing redressal in cases of sexual harassment at the workplace.

MJAS identifies the lack of education as a major factor for discrimination and social injustices. We work continuously with children / youth and community groups to ensure that every child has access to education. In addition to monitoring school enrollment, we have made a concerted effort to motivate parents and students, especially girls, to remain in school.

We work with adolescent groups on the right to education and understanding of age-relevant issues, express their concerns, understand their rights and learn about available opportunities. MJAS works with three age groups — 6 to 9, 10 to 13, and 14 to 18. These groups include children who attend school regularly, irregularly, as well as dropouts. Working with children and adolescents builds their confidence to speak up in their homes and community to express their concerns and desires.

Youth Intervention
In 2017, MJAS brought together over 6,500 students from 19 villages to address the issues and concerns with schools and education system and factors which had led to high drop-out rates. Recommendations for improving the mid-day meal scheme were submitted to the relevant school authorities. Discussions were also held on improving the quality of education and school enrolment. Proposals were submitted to respective panchayats for action. This resulted in a decrease in dropouts, an increase in enrolment in Class 1 and a number of boys and girls being readmitted to the three secondary schools in Nayi Khera, Mankhand and Meeno ka Naya Gaon.

MJAS’ close relationship with the local media has enabled it to experiment with the use of innovative media and communication strategies. Workshops on writing and documentation and experiments with local newspapers like ‘Khabar Lahariya’ and ‘Ujala Chhadi’ led MJAS workers to publish their own ‘Khabran Ri Potli’ to report and deliberate on policy and welfare initiatives of local government and political leaders. The MJAS team also publishes a children’s journal ‘Aamli’ and a quarterly newspaper ‘Samachar Ro Helo’ which provide updates on issues of local and national importance. These publications have helped to raise awareness of local and national issues among the local population.

Creating Employability through Vocational Trainings
The MJAS team constantly offers vocational trainings, particularly to its young members, in areas of skill development, personality development, visioning, communication and leadership skills. In addition, MJAS team members are encouraged to participate in programmes organised within its network as well as those held by other institutions. It is hoped that its young members will be the new generation of activists who will continue the ongoing struggle of equal rights into the future.

Livelihood Training for Women and Youth
After identifying potential livelihood opportunities in the area of tourism, the MJAS team worked with various organisations in Rajasthan and across India to develop a training centre in Ajmer for local youth to become tour managers and guides. MJAS also initiates activities to identify villages and families in its work areas that would benefit from rural tourism. MJAS has interacted with select tourism firms and has visited locations to study rural eco-tourism and homestay models. MJAS promotes the art of making handicrafts like puppets and home décor articles as a means of not only preserving local art but also creating self- employment opportunities for young women.
In addition, young women have been trained as drivers through the vocational training programme of the Azad Foundation, Jaipur. This programme also focuses on women empowerment through self-sufficiency.

In the wake of the Bisalpur Dam rehabilitation, many cases of sexual violence started emerging. Between 1996 and 2006, MJAS actively intervened in a number of rape cases. It all began with the case of Dhapu Meena and while our involvement in this case did not result in justice for Dhapu, it did result in the activists gaining the confidence and respect of women in rural areas and survivors of the violence began to approach MJAS, which enabled the organisation to take a stand in support of these women, as seen in Meena’s case. Read more about her case..

Jan Sunvaai
In 2007, in collaboration with the Mahila Atyachar Virodhi Manch, MJAS organised a jan sunvaai (public hearing) which spread awareness on various redressal mechanisms for cases of violence against women. Read More

Supporting the Survivors of Violence
We realised that changing the socio-cultural situation would be a major challenge but we remained steadfast in efforts to support women survivors of the violence and have made a conscious effort to develop strategies around stopping such violence against women. Read more about the survivor stories..

MJAS has also worked extensively with the Panchayati Raj Institutions to strengthen its ability to address different forms of violence against women. We have worked tirelessly to empower the Panchayati Raj Institutions to address violence against women and provide timely redressal to survivors of violence. Read more on this..

Through our work with the marginalised communities, we have recognised violence is sometimes used as a tool to ensure women are constrained to the socially defined boundaries of behaviour and space. MJAS works to address violence against women in the context of various customary practices like child / early marriage nata, labelling women as dayans / dakans which not only negatively impacts their physical health, but also harms their mental health and the well-being of their children. In our efforts, we have brought many cases of violence and injustice to light regarding many traditional practices. Gradually, we have started working on children’s issues as well. Read more on the case study of Indira and Lali Dhaker..

Child Marriage
Rajasthan has a large number of girls who are married below the legal age of 18 and bear children at a very young age. This comes with an adverse impact on their health and socio-economic well-being. Traditional customs and norms sanctioning the practice, compounded with low levels of education, poverty and economic dependence on traditional subsistence like agriculture or migration to urban centres for work, perpetuate high rates of child marriage and child pregnancy.Read more about our campaigns and programmes on early and child marriage..

Health and nutrition are intrinsically linked with inequality and discrimination. Women and children are often denied equal access to the already limited village health and nutrition resources. Improved access to these resources can empower and protect marginalised women and children and reduce deep rooted injustices and abuse persisting in the society.

Our Intervention
Mobilising the community and other stakeholders to ensure that women and children have easy access to village healthcare services i.e. Primary Health Centres, Sub-Health Centres, Child Health Centres and Anganwadis. Ensure the delivery of services to pregnant and lactating mothers, children and to the community at large through regular health check-ups for children in schools to monitor their health and facilitate intervention when required. Read more about our Health and Nutrition Programme with CRY..

Over the last two decades in particular, women are no longer confined to the domestic sphere but have ventured into the public sphere especially for work. MJAS has actively intervened in cases of workplace sexual harassment reported at the Ajmer Education Department, District Collector’s Office, Employment Office and the Railway Department. Our intervention in several cases has revealed many workplaces do not have internal committees on anti-sexual harassment or Prevention of Sexual Harassment (POSH). In addition to this, we also work with women to understand their rights in the workplace and the importance of accessing redressal in cases of sexual harassment at the workplace.

MJAS identifies the lack of education as a major factor for discrimination and social injustices. We work continuously with children / youth and community groups to ensure that every child has access to education. In addition to monitoring school enrollment, we have made a concerted effort to motivate parents and students, especially girls, to remain in school.

We work with XXXX adolescent groups on the right to education and understanding of age-relevant issues, express their concerns, understand their rights and learn about available opportunities. MJAS works with three age groups — 6 to 9, 10 to 13, and 14 to 18. These groups include children who attend school regularly, irregularly, as well as dropouts. Working with children and adolescents builds their confidence to speak up in their homes and community to express their concerns and desires.

Youth Intervention
In 2017, MJAS brought together over 6,500 students from 19 villages to address the issues and concerns with schools and education system and factors which had led to high drop-out rates. Recommendations for improving the mid-day meal scheme were submitted to the relevant school authorities. Discussions were also held on improving the quality of education and school enrolment. Proposals were submitted to respective panchayats for action. This resulted in a decrease in dropouts, an increase in enrolment in Class 1 and a number of boys and girls being readmitted to the three secondary schools in Nayi Khera, Mankhand and Meeno ka Naya Gaon.